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TL Master Chef/Cooking Crew
#26
ok, I'll do it your way Smile

I'll let you know how it goes. I normally use a huge pork butt so I don't really have a frame of reference, 60g it is!

Cheers
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#27
(07-28-2016, 03:46 PM)stresser Wrote: ok, I'll do it your way Smile

I'll let you know how it goes. I normally use a huge pork butt so I don't really have a frame of reference, 60g it is!

Cheers

ChefSteps have a video if you're interested.





Gradient brines are faster (you're using far more salt than you want the meat to actually have; you can brine in fifteen minutes if you dump enough salt in!) but are easy to screw up if you forget about it and leave it for too long.

Equilibrium brines are slower (no fifteen minute brines...leave it for hours) but very precise and very reliable, and overdoing it because you forgot where you left it is not so much a factor.

ETA: I would bump the salt content up slightly more. Check your figures again; you have slightly more than 4kg total weight to work with, and 2% of 4kg is 80g exactly. If you have the salt content sitting at 75, that should cover the extra weight.
A penis lives a terrible life. His hair is a mess, his family are nuts, his neighbour is an asshole, his best friend is a pussy, someone keeps beating him...

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#28
(07-27-2016, 04:43 AM)SSgt Corvus Wrote: Stir Fry has been my jam lately, because holy fuck easy and healthy.

I'm a big fan of one-pot meals, stews and soups and the like, or stuff I can make in a slow cooker. Probably one of my favorite things to make is this Portuguese stew, made from white beans, kale, chicken sausage, diced tomato, and sauteed onion.


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What is everyone's best meal (to entertain with, not your personal fave).


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#29
(07-28-2016, 04:12 PM)Wombitch Wrote: ETA: I would bump the salt content up slightly more. Check your figures again; you have slightly more than 4kg total weight to work with, and 2% of 4kg is 80g exactly. If you have the salt content sitting at 75, that should cover the extra weight.

oh, I was shooting for half your curing content, so 15g per kg, I'll add another 20g dissolved in water tonight.

Last night I used 60g dark brown sugar and 60G pickling salt, tbsp. of savory, thyme, crushed peppers and 3 large cloves of garlic through a press, brought to a boil and simmered for 10 min.

This one was actually pretty tasty, generally when I make a 24 hr brine it's not palatable.
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#30
Wife wants to buy a combo charcoal/gas grill (50/50 split) so she can try out some gas grill recipes she's found.

I am on board with this.

(I'm forcing the 50/50 grill because I prefer charcoal to gas myself)
Just a dumb grunt.
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#31
(07-29-2016, 03:40 AM)stresser Wrote:
(07-28-2016, 04:12 PM)Wombitch Wrote: ETA: I would bump the salt content up slightly more. Check your figures again; you have slightly more than 4kg total weight to work with, and 2% of 4kg is 80g exactly. If you have the salt content sitting at 75, that should cover the extra weight.

oh, I was shooting for half your curing content, so 15g per kg, I'll add another 20g dissolved in water tonight.

Last night I used 60g dark brown sugar and 60G pickling salt, tbsp. of savory, thyme, crushed peppers and 3 large cloves of garlic through a press, brought to a boil and simmered for 10 min.

This one was actually pretty tasty, generally when I make a 24 hr brine it's not palatable.

I told you so. Smile

Rule one of a good cook: TASTE EVERYTHING. Not a great deal of food at once, but a spoonful of sauce here or testing the salt content in pasta water there...these hints that you get from tasting will help you get a sense for how the finished meal will be. Taste, adjust based on what you find, and then taste again.

The more delicate flavours of this brine are more or less what you need them to be. Think it through. How are you supposed to be sure you have the flavours balanced as you want them if the component you're wondering about (whether it's seasoning on a piece of meat, a sauce, the basic groundwork like pasta water or a brine) is something you can't actually stand to have in your mouth?

On any given night, I have a herd of spoons in the various pockets of my jacket so I can check anything and everything. So many spoons. It's possible to get personalised tasting spoons that almost clip into place on the pocket so they won't get lost, and with a name on it, but...frankly, that's a little overkill! I do not want to be "Chef Jules" because my spoon says I should be; I'm either one name or the other, not both!



Staff meal tonight was lamb ragu (mostly lamb neck, heart and liver...we love our cheap cuts very much in the back room Tongue) and the objective consolation of an enormous bowl of pasta to eat it with. Misc greens, using up the contents of the walk in, with the most basic of vinaigrettes. Old bread repurposed as garlic bread.
A penis lives a terrible life. His hair is a mess, his family are nuts, his neighbour is an asshole, his best friend is a pussy, someone keeps beating him...

Poor thing.
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#32
(07-28-2016, 05:12 AM)SSgt Corvus Wrote:
(07-27-2016, 09:01 AM)notoriousfavi Wrote:
(07-27-2016, 03:59 AM)Handicap Wrote: I went to Pizza Hut last night.

It was delicious.

gross



(07-27-2016, 04:43 AM)SSgt Corvus Wrote: Stir Fry has been my jam lately, because holy fuck easy and healthy.

I'm a big fan of one-pot meals, stews and soups and the like, or stuff I can make in a slow cooker. Probably one of my favorite things to make is this Portuguese stew, made from white beans, kale, chicken sausage, diced tomato, and sauteed onion.

Interesting.  Seems simple enough.  May try later this week.


here's the recipe: http://www.realsimple.com/food-recipes/browse-all-recipes/bean-sausage-stew

Stir fry is my mufucking jam bro.  I posted this in the old forums but one of my favorite things to do is to "pre-cook" the meat nd vegetables in 2 completely different ways before combining them.

Like, I'll pick up a crazy american marinade for the meats then drop soy and Worcestershire or chili powder, etc into the veggies and then toss it all together on high heat.  It makes for some super interesting tastes.  

One of my favorite things about stir fry is it's also super fucking versatile.  You can combine it with just about anything and create a full meal that's different from the meal you made the night before.  Rice, pasta, noodles, burritos, bake it into something.  You can do so much with it. 
CPD: after you beat up someone you gotta take something from them.  CPD: it can be food, money, their anal virginity, whatever, but you gotta take something from him

#FREEHCT


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#33
Tonight, I'm making my very own poverty alfredo. Stay tuned for pics

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#34
Simple dinner over the weekend.

Thawed out a frozen boneless pork shoulder, dropped it into a crock pot added some potatoes, carrots, leftover BBQ-sauce I had sitting around, a cup of whiskey, some random "A1" brand powder steak seasoning, Dill, chili powder, paprika and Worcestershire to taste.

Let the entire thing slow cook until it just broke apart when I ran a wooden spoon through it.
Waiter? Waiter? Ah, when will I remember- Order desert first, THEN kill everyone in the restaurant.
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#35
Wife made some amazing salmon and shrimp last night.

Probably one of the best things to come from us having children, aside from the children themselves, is her learning how to cook better so that we weren't constantly heating up frozen food in the oven or microwave. It's been such an amazing change to come home over the years and go from seeing boxes of whatever was in the freezer on the counter with a timer ticking down to actual ingredients and raw food spread along prep boards, with the heady aroma of garlic (we like garlic a lot) and other spices permeating the air in the kitchen and house in general.

Other benefits include eating healthier, etc.
Just a dumb grunt.
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#36
(07-29-2016, 08:33 AM)Wombitch Wrote: I told you so. Smile

Rule one of a good cook: TASTE EVERYTHING. Not a great deal of food at once, but a spoonful of sauce here or testing the salt content in pasta water there...these hints that you get from tasting will help you get a sense for how the finished meal will be. Taste, adjust based on what you find, and then taste again.

The more delicate flavours of this brine are more or less what you need them to be. Think it through. How are you supposed to be sure you have the flavours balanced as you want them if the component you're wondering about (whether it's seasoning on a piece of meat, a sauce, the basic groundwork like pasta water or a brine) is something you can't actually stand to have in your mouth?

Ok, So, you were completely right!

It brined well and was tasty, but I think the meat was too lean as while it wasn't dry per se, it was dryer than I'd like. I had a technical difficulty (too much beer) and it ended up spiking to 350F for a 45-60 min. The smoke ring only penetrated about 1/4 inch at most. 1/8 mostly.

Next time, I think I'd make sure to use a salt with nitrates in it, as I'd like to get that nice pink colour inside. I've had that before when I've used sea salt instead of pickling salt.

I think I'm not using enough smoke too. I tend to get a nice constant stream of it like a boiling kettle and maintain that, but I might be having circulation issues keeping it from really wrapping around the meat.

My rig needs work, it was back drafting now that I've got a more elaborate structure which shelters the main body from the wind, but the intake sticks out into it. Also hotspots continue to be a problem... I'll have to change to a basket style charcoal holder and add a diffusion plate.

Cheers
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#37
Forgot to take pics last night, but it was decent for not being a WOP myself. My chicken was tasteless. I guess I need to season it more.
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#38
McCormick makes a roasted garlic and red pepper seasoning that I masturbate to and combine with chicken. It's so good I masturbate again.
CPD: after you beat up someone you gotta take something from them.  CPD: it can be food, money, their anal virginity, whatever, but you gotta take something from him

#FREEHCT


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#39
(08-02-2016, 08:38 AM)stresser Wrote:
(07-29-2016, 08:33 AM)Wombitch Wrote: I told you so. Smile

Rule one of a good cook: TASTE EVERYTHING. Not a great deal of food at once, but a spoonful of sauce here or testing the salt content in pasta water there...these hints that you get from tasting will help you get a sense for how the finished meal will be. Taste, adjust based on what you find, and then taste again.

The more delicate flavours of this brine are more or less what you need them to be. Think it through. How are you supposed to be sure you have the flavours balanced as you want them if the component you're wondering about (whether it's seasoning on a piece of meat, a sauce, the basic groundwork like pasta water or a brine) is something you can't actually stand to have in your mouth?

Ok, So, you were completely right!

It brined well and was tasty, but I think the meat was too lean as while it wasn't dry per se, it was dryer than I'd like. I had a technical difficulty (too much beer) and it ended up spiking to 350F for a 45-60 min. The smoke ring only penetrated about 1/4 inch at most. 1/8 mostly.

Next time, I think I'd make sure to use a salt with nitrates in it, as I'd like to get that nice pink colour inside. I've had that before when I've used sea salt instead of pickling salt.

I think I'm not using enough smoke too. I tend to get a nice constant stream of it like a boiling kettle and maintain that, but I might be having circulation issues keeping it from really wrapping around the meat.

My rig needs work, it was back drafting now that I've got a more elaborate structure which shelters the main body from the wind, but the intake sticks out into it. Also hotspots continue to be a problem... I'll have to change to a basket style charcoal holder and add a diffusion plate.

Cheers

The dryness probably IS the result of uneven temperature and/or too much beer. 350F is way too high! Play with your rig a little until you think you've solved the hot spots, watch your beer quotient (as tempting as it is not to, precise temperatures are a little easier sans drunk-logic Tongue), watch the moisture levels in the smoker (you've chosen a very lean cut, prone to drying out over long cooking times...a little care compensates for this somewhat) and try it again Smile You'll perfect it eventually.

And yes, the smoke has to circulate as freely as possible. If it has somewhere it can't reach, all that is is somewhere it can't help improve.



The peas in my garden will be ready soon. I have Plans for them. Big Grin
A penis lives a terrible life. His hair is a mess, his family are nuts, his neighbour is an asshole, his best friend is a pussy, someone keeps beating him...

Poor thing.
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#40
[Image: 8140581ae080d993f07254b12d12e4fe.jpg] meh

Korean BBQ seasoned (bad quality) salmon. Grilled watermelon w arugula and goat cheese (chèvre), balsamic reduction. Will include panzanela next time and put too much oil on watermelon and grill so couldn't get grill marks that well


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#41
(08-02-2016, 03:54 PM)hussaf Wrote: Korean BBQ seasoned (bad quality) salmon.  Grilled watermelon w arugula and goat cheese (chèvre), balsamic reduction.  Will include panzanela next time and put too much oil on watermelon and grill so couldn't get grill marks that well


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holy fuck, it looks good.  Keep at it.  It's all about trial and error
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#42
(08-02-2016, 03:54 PM)hussaf Wrote: [Image: 8140581ae080d993f07254b12d12e4fe.jpg] meh

Korean BBQ seasoned (bad quality) salmon.  Grilled watermelon w arugula and goat cheese (chèvre), balsamic reduction.  Will include panzanela next time and put too much oil on watermelon and grill so couldn't get grill marks that well


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Very nice work. Smile

I've been telling you all along that your kitchen instincts are good ones. You cook better (and certainly put more effort into cooking) at home than I do.
A penis lives a terrible life. His hair is a mess, his family are nuts, his neighbour is an asshole, his best friend is a pussy, someone keeps beating him...

Poor thing.
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#43
Speaking of salmon, do I really have to go thorough all this to make it safe to eat raw/sashimi;



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#44
(08-03-2016, 06:04 AM)Tikilounge Wrote: Speaking of salmon, do I really have to go thorough all this to make it safe to eat raw/sashimi;




No. You can eat it as it is if you prefer, if you're sure beyond all doubt that your fish is good quality and has no parasites.

Curing it like that just allows the fish to firm up a little (changing the texture...and texture is a big part of what makes sashimi good), boosts and/or rounds out the flavour slightly (some varieties of fish are salt cured, some are treated with vinegar, some have nothing done at all...it depends on the fish and what will balance it out) and and to an extent can be used to make fish that's nearly-but-not-quite perfect a little better. With something like sashimi (or really any raw-fish dish, like ceviche or Italian crudo) the concept is so simple that there's absolutely no room to hide - if the fish isn't flawlessly fresh and perfect, you WILL know it.
A penis lives a terrible life. His hair is a mess, his family are nuts, his neighbour is an asshole, his best friend is a pussy, someone keeps beating him...

Poor thing.
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#45
Is there a big difference in taste and parasite risk between ocean or freshwater salmon?

Would freezing help to sanitize it? (or re-freezing in my case since hardly any fish is fresh out here)
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#46
(08-03-2016, 06:54 AM)Tikilounge Wrote: Is there a big difference in taste and parasite risk between ocean or freshwater salmon?

Would freezing help to sanitize it? (or re-freezing in my case since hardly any fish is fresh out here)

Your first question has a few too many variables to answer clearly. Farmed vs wild, the state and population density of the water it lives in, location...there are a lot of things that can affect it. In general, differences are slight and it SHOULD be safe regardless, but there are outliers. How much can you tell me about where you get yours?

Freeze once, well wrapped to keep air out and moisture in; a lot of salmon will be frozen directly on the boat on the same day it's caught, and that counts as once. Only once, and then when you use it thaw in a controlled way in the fridge. Colour varies according to diet (some farmed salmon can even be grey, just because the food doesn't have the same compounds in it as wild fish would eat in their diet) so it's not in itself a good indicator of freshness or quality, but it can help.

- Whatever colour it is should be even and clear throughout; no faded patches or discolouration
- If it was sold with any skin on, the skin should look moist and fit closely to the meat; skin draws away from the meat as the fish breaks down, and individual scales start to loosen.
- The meat should look moist (not slimy or filmy, you were right), have a slight springiness to it and any cuts should be clean; no ragged edges or discolouration at the sites of the cuts
- If you can see the head, look at the eyes and gills. Bright, clear eyes that aren't sunken in and a rich colour at the inside of the gills
- It should NOT smell fishy or strong.
A penis lives a terrible life. His hair is a mess, his family are nuts, his neighbour is an asshole, his best friend is a pussy, someone keeps beating him...

Poor thing.
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#47
Thanks lady
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#48
For a good charcoal grill, i cant even begin to reccomend a big green egg enough. I have had mine for 7 years i think.

Smoke meats, bake, grill, sear, make pizza, etc.

The price is high, but awesome warranty. I even have an amazen smoker that uses pellets, i use that to cold smoke cheese and bacon. And hot peppers to dehydrate into smoked pepper powder.
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#49
(08-03-2016, 08:10 AM)Tikilounge Wrote: Thanks lady

De nada, Smile

As a PSA to all, tech support and "what am I doing wrong?" questions like that would also fit in here

I don't particularly want to take over this thread with trouble-shooting or general info from a working cook's perspective (work is not home; not even I cook "chef" food at home!) and chances are good that in that many pages I may already have answered what you need. Use both threads freely - show off here, ask for technical help there.
A penis lives a terrible life. His hair is a mess, his family are nuts, his neighbour is an asshole, his best friend is a pussy, someone keeps beating him...

Poor thing.
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#50
(07-29-2016, 04:36 AM)Handicap Wrote: Wife wants to buy a combo charcoal/gas grill (50/50 split) so she can try out some gas grill recipes she's found.

I am on board with this.

(I'm forcing the 50/50 grill because I prefer charcoal to gas myself)


I don't know if you've purchased already or not but you might want to consider this:

http://www.pitbarrelcooker.com

Simple to use, offers a lot of variety in cooking styles and about the same price range of split grills that I saw. I wouldn't say that it is the complete solution for cooking varieties, it does have some drawbacks but I really like mine. Watch their recipe videos....

Does the wife not want to mess with charcoal? Startup time, flame, just unfamiliar with?

(08-02-2016, 03:54 PM)hussaf Wrote: [Image: 8140581ae080d993f07254b12d12e4fe.jpg] meh

Korean BBQ seasoned (bad quality) salmon.  Grilled watermelon w arugula and goat cheese (chèvre), balsamic reduction.  Will include panzanela next time and put too much oil on watermelon and grill so couldn't get grill marks that well


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You plate a mean meal Sir.
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