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Ask a cop.
#51
(03-07-2015, 06:00 PM)silverado_mick Wrote:
(03-07-2015, 02:40 PM)NSFgirl Wrote: That pretty much mirrors the loud noise complaints we get.  We joke that our rate MA really stands for Military Adult because, most often that's all we are.

I think my second pet peeve after those calls are being on scene with a partner who can't remain courteous and professional, and needs more babysitting than they are helpful.

A few things I'm big on is; communication, professionalism, awareness of the situation at hand, and it doesn't matter if you are friends or not, always have your partner's back.

How much re-learning/learning of new or different techniques did you have to do in transition from .mil training to civ patrol?

Is there an age limit on patrol, or is it more how well you pass the various tests, and your physical fitness level?


All of my .mil MP experience was on the field side.  Aside from a security detail at the Marine Corps Marathon one year, I did exactly zero LE related stuff while I was in.  Never once set foot in PMO.  The training we received at MP school covered all that, but it wasn't ingrained enough in my mind that I had to re train anything away when I became a civvie cop.   

Departments set their own hiring standards, to include age limits if they have them.  I know the state police here cut off at 40.  I think the City does as well.  It's more about your fitness level and your ability to pass the academy.

What year was this?
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#52
Cpl Verde, that had to be 2001 I think. Maybe 2002 but I doubt it. Pretty sure the year my unit worked the Marathon was 2001.



(03-08-2015, 01:23 AM)29PalmsGrunt Wrote: Not sure if this applies to you guys, but as I understand it, there are situations where a person can choose not to press charges on someone but a police department can choose to, even after the fact. It makes total sense if say, a lady was being beat by her guy and chances are he will do it again or worse after they leave, but it works with things like petty theft as well. How does that work? Are people just fucked if it was a legitimate misunderstanding? Even if not, are both parties dragged into the legal process and court even if they tried to avoid it by not pressing charges?


It depends on the scenario.  Most of the time we say "no victim, no crime".  Why would we want to go through all the work of prosecuting a case if the victim is uncooperative or wants nothing done?  In the cases where we don't need the victim, it's generally got to be a serious enough crime that we caught the bad guy in the act of doing for us to proceed with the case without a victim. 

A couple months ago we got a third party call about a domestic in a parking lot where the male half was pointing a gun at the the female half.  We arrive and the male runs.  Long story short an off duty fireman saw him throw the gun over some row houses before I caught up to him and took him to the ground.  I go back and find the gun where he threw it, but of course the girlfriend doesn't want to prosecute and says that nothing happened.

I go and interview the guy, basically lie my ass off and get a full, written confession out of him saying that he had the gun but that he "didn't pull it out or nuffin".  That case, I will prosecute to the best of my ability even though there isn't technically a "victim" per say.  The bad guy is a convicted felon with robbery and agg assault in his history.  No good can come of him being out and illegally carrying a gun, so I will do my best to put him back in.  Now if the circumstances were different I may have been less inclined to burn this guy.  Like if he hadn't run, or thrown the gun over a row house where it landed quite literally among a group of kids playing on the next street over, or if he wasn't already known to be a violent felon, then I might be more inclined to listen to whatever excuses he had for having/using a gun in that manner.  Know what I mean?  

(03-08-2015, 03:35 PM)CPD Wrote: What are some guns you wish you could have kept from guys you've arrested?

There's been a couple.  The worst one was a 1911 built by Union Switch and Signal which was a company in the town that I police during WW2.  They made a vary limited number of 1911's as part of the war effort, and that pistol belongs in a museum, not being melted down.  

How many of your co-workers actually have degrees? Are the degrees in useful majors?

Most of the full time officers I work with have at least an associates or bachelors, most of them in Criminal Justice.

Do things like Crisis Intervention training/FTO and things like that pay more per month than a degree for your specific department?

For my specific department?  No they don't.  Detectives and Sgt's make 5% more that base patrolmen, and Lt's make 10% more.  There's a shift differential for working 2nd or 3rd shift.  Other than that, the only incentives to take on special duties are perks that come along with them.   

Have any of your co-workers in the past or present taken steroids?

Yes.  

How hard is it to be the guy who gets to work with the K-9 unit?

You mean the dog handler?  Like everything else it varies by department.  At mine they pretty much picked who they wanted to be the K-9 handlers based on their performance.  They rewarded the guys who were hard workers by giving them a dog to work with.  I thought that was pretty cool, but I was a litte upset that by the time we got around to putting a second dog on the street I was already detailed out and wasn't eligible for the position.

That cover everything?
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#53
Yup, thanks for the answers.
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#54
You writing a paper or something? Lol. Gotta hand it to you dude you do have the ability to ask good questions.
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#55
I'm just a guy who likes to ask questions.
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#56
Mick, I remember you saying that you have a great deal of autonomy when out on patrol. You can drive around, or sit in a lot and shitpost on TL most shifts. Can you listen to music in your squad car? I'd imagine you'd be able to run the radio and a stereo at the same time.
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#57
(03-09-2015, 12:15 PM)soup Wrote: Mick, I remember you saying that you have a great deal of autonomy when out on patrol. You can drive around, or sit in a lot and shitpost on TL most shifts. Can you listen to music in your squad car? I'd imagine you'd be able to run the radio and a stereo at the same time.

Yeah listening to music is fine.  I get on rookies about it though because they should be listening to what's going on around them rather than the radio.  If I have it on it's because we are slow and there's nothing else going on.  Like most other things, it's fine in moderation, as long as you learn how to keep it from interfereing with the performance of your duty.

Also, I don't care how fucking cold it is, crack your windows.  You'd be surprised how much more you can hear with them open just a crack vs being closed the whole way.  Conversely, as soon as the wailer comes on, you close those shits up.  Drowning yourself out on the radio is a good way to make it harder for your backup to find you. 
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#58
Lets just say 2 things should get drilled into an officer.
1: always answer the radio
2: somebody is always watching you
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#59
(03-09-2015, 12:24 PM)oldwinger Wrote: Lets just say 2 things should get drilled into an officer.
1: always answer the radio
2: somebody is always watching you

So much this. I don't really listen to the radio (am/fm). And I was first trained to let dispatch/other patrols know where I'm responding from, as opposed to "en route" which could mean anywhere from 1min to. 30+, quite a difference in response time.

Along with answering radios, we have those guys who want to tell a,long ass story over the net, or they talk over each other.
You'll have to speak up, I'm not wearing any pants.

F18WrenchMonkey: NSF is grand master champion at being apathetic
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#60
(03-09-2015, 12:41 PM)NSFgirl Wrote:
(03-09-2015, 12:24 PM)oldwinger Wrote: Lets just say 2 things should get drilled into an officer.
1: always answer the radio
2: somebody is always watching you

So much this. I don't really listen to the radio (am/fm).  And I was first trained to let dispatch/other patrols know where I'm responding from, as opposed to "en route" which could mean anywhere from 1min to. 30+, quite a difference in response time.

Along with answering radios, we have those guys who want to tell a,long ass story over the net, or they talk over each other.  Maybe its just different for me since not a cop.

There is one on every shift.



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#61
Interested in your $0.02. I agree with the author's general points.

http://www.cnn.com/2015/03/12/opinions/johnson-shank-ferguson-lessons/index.html
The Kool-Aid is a lie.
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#62
One thing I'm tired of is being painted with the Ferguson brush. There are plenty of departments that are not run that way and as far as the officers I work with from day to day over 90% of us show up everyday and do an honest job to the best of our abilities. As far as going out of our way "to keep the brother down" my dept is about 50% black and 30% hispanic, us white boys are the minority.
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#63
Fair enough, though I think* your department is in the minority (ha). That said, I also believe that minority representation is important in all aspects of life in a diverse society, from law enforcement to media to education. How about your thoughts on the militarization of police?
The Kool-Aid is a lie.
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#64
To add to what winger said, those "studies" are always skewed. If you look at the numbers, policemen/women in the US arrest a disproportionate amount of blacks. But if a similarly disproportionate amount of blacks are the one commiting crimes, then what is the solution? Let black criminals go because you don't want your numbers to reflect a racial bias? That's absurd.

I seem to recall quite clearly learning room clearing tactics from the LASD and LAPD swat guys when I was in the Marines. The military and LEO's have always shared equipment and tactics, it's nothing new. I honestly don't see what the big deal is, since it's the person behind the badge, vest, and gun, that makes the difference.
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#65
How many arrests do you make for misdemeanors compared to felonies?

What kind of pranks have you pulled on your coworkers/supervisors?

What restaurant in your area gives you the best deal?
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#66
Is there an equivalent of Farva in your dept?
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#67
Everyone has a Farva on their department, same as Pvt Pyle in the Corps.
Misdemeanor arrest depends on the suspects attitude for me (I tend to do it if someone needs a lesson learned) there is more than one way to resolve a misdemeanor, Felonies different story, that's why they are felonies. Pranks are limited to how much effort you put in to them. Some people just make it easy. I don't go into restaurants expecting a break, too many people see it and will jump to conclusions.
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#68
(03-14-2015, 01:05 PM)CPD Wrote: How many arrests do you make for misdemeanors compared to felonies?

What kind of pranks have you pulled on your coworkers/supervisors?

What restaurant in your area gives you the best deal?

Me personally? Probably 1 in 5 of my arrests is a felony. The other 4 would be varying levels of Misdameanor. 

Pepper spray and creativity, turning the sirens on while the car is off so that when they turn it on all of the bells and whistles come on too, badge upside down on shirt, using the drive stun option on a Taser as an alarm clock...dude there's a million of them. 

Veltres gives us 30% off, and their food is good. Eat n park gives 50% but it's pretty much guarenteed that if we go in and sit down to eat, we will be called away before done.  Some of the other places in town it depends on the manager, but to be honest most of the options in town are crap anyway. 
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#69
Sucks to hear about that 1911 getting melted down. Laws will never be able to "act" sensibly in every case
The Kool-Aid is a lie.
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#70
Right now my EAS is July 2015. I am on the fence of accepting a 3 year Reenlistment package to a non-deployable unit in Camp Talega, or get out and join any of the local police agencies in sd/orange county. If you were in my shoes, what would you recommend? Also, how long does the process take from the written test to the academy?
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#71
(03-14-2015, 03:11 PM)npr Wrote: Sucks to hear about that 1911 getting melted down.  Laws will never be able to "act" sensibly in every case

(03-15-2015, 06:50 PM)Good_Squire Wrote: Right now my EAS is July 2015. I am on the fence of accepting a 3 year Reenlistment package to a non-deployable unit in Camp Talega, or get out and join any of the local police agencies in sd/orange county. If you were in my shoes, what would you recommend? Also, how long does the process take from the written test to the academy?

Not LE, but a citizen that has done some techie stuff for the blue-people (some wear brown).


Escondido has too much stupid. This particular dept is plagued with retards. There is not one facet of policing that these people have not fucked.

SD County people seem to have acceptable training level, but some of their radio networks need work - not good for a dept that does significant amount of work in remote rural areas.

Carlsbad and Oceanslime have politicol problems, and is starting to directly effect LE management.

Many SD cities contract with county mounties, so there are always other places to go if your initial beat sucks.

S.D. city is a bit underpaid when compared to equivalent cities, and am not impressed with the rank and file weapons proficiency.

Ignore the stupid register articles, Irvine PD is professional, and has high standards. 

LE Life tends tends to suck for most small OC depts in northern 2/3 of county - Santa Ana and Stanton have exponential suck factors. Communities south of Tustin probably more tolerable.

Good luck dealing with cranky old bastards such as self.
there is no safety in numbers. numbers do not lie.
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#72
Well right now I've sent applications to San Diego, Costa Mesa and the Orange county sheriff's department. San Diego sheriff's isnt open until April 1st. Thank you for the info. Do you have any idea how long the application process usually takes?
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#73
(03-16-2015, 12:54 PM)Good_Squire Wrote: Well right now I've sent applications to San Diego, Costa Mesa and the Orange county sheriff's department. San Diego sheriff's isnt open until April 1st. Thank you for the info. Do you have any idea how long the application process usually takes?

Dunno - am definitely not, and have never been, LE. Know a former training officer for sheriff's dept, said it can take months, but that was back in 2012.

Have you looked at Riverside County sheriffs dept?
there is no safety in numbers. numbers do not lie.
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#74
I don't know either. Process varies from department to department. Most academies that are full time are around 6 months, but as far as the hiring process goes, that can sometimes take as long as a year or two depending on the civil service test/list and a bunch of other factors. Maybe look on the departments websites to get an idea? Sorry I can't be more help.
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#75
@OldFart: that's alright, I'm going to scour online for more info. That's a great idea! Riverside county probably wouldn't be a bad idea to apply there.

@silverado_mick: Thank you anyway. I think I just need to do more of my own research. I know it can depend on dept and the time period that you joined.
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