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Ask a cop.
#26
(03-02-2015, 11:25 AM)CPD Wrote: What's the most money/drugs/weapons you've come across during a raid? What about during a routine traffic stop?

How often do cops quit and enter a different career field before 10 years?

What are some interesting things you've learned about criminal organizations you've investigated or had contact with?

My team currently holds the record for the largest seizure of drugs and money in Allegheny County history.  We seized 21 kilos of coke, $612,000, four cars, two guns (one stolen) and some other miscellaneous shit.  Best part is that it wasn't a wiretap or a huge drawn out investigation, we did it while running interdiction at a local hotel.  Followed the right car, knew what we were looking at when we saw it, did a traffic stop on the right vehicle, and basically put that whole mess together in about 18 hours.  "Routine" traffic stop?  Probably around 10 to 12 grams of heroin in a car.  Nothing huge really, I'm not lucky that way.


I don't really know.  I've seen some make a switch successfully, but most of them were guys I wouldn't want to work with for the long hall anyway.  I say all the time that I wish I could get out, but the fact is that if I left I'd miss the hell out of it.  It's just something that's part of the way I'm wired.

How organized they can be.  Even some of the street level (small time) dealers we investigate have fairly set hours that they work, and a relatively set chain of command that they follow.  That surprised me when I first stated noticing the trend.  also, how incredibly dumb and greedy they can be.  We've had guys ho knew we were onto them for months, could name all our cars, knew when we were there watching, knew that they were selling to an informant or a UCD, but they still kept doing it because they didn't know how to stop.  

It'a also interesting how after three years of working dope I find myself empathizing more and more with the dealers (at least the older ones who've been in the game for awhile).  They generand they don't take things as personally as one would think.  That's not across the board, but it's just something I find myself remarking about from time to time.  Also the influence of TV never fails to amaze me.  Lots of people still think I have to tell them I'm a cop if they ask me, or think that we have to read them their rights if they are under arrest, myths that are perpetuated in the movies and on TV, but aren't at all based in reality.

(03-02-2015, 12:55 PM)Cpl Verde Wrote:
(03-02-2015, 12:46 PM)silverado_mick Wrote:
(03-02-2015, 11:16 AM)Cpl Verde Wrote:
(03-02-2015, 11:09 AM)silverado_mick Wrote:
(03-02-2015, 10:46 AM)Cpl Verde Wrote: Taser cross draw keeps it from being confused for a pistol... muscle memory draw aim pull trigger... whoops that wasn't my taser...

That's where I wore mine when I carried one.  Not awkward at all as long as you're not 400 lbs and shaped like a beach ball.  I always discourage rookies from strong side taser carry.  I'd hate to reach for a taser and come up with a pistol, or even worse reach for a pitsol and come up with a taser.  I know you should be able to train that away, but why not hedge your bets that much more?

You're so much more eloquent than I am. I bet your reports never get kicked back...


The downside of being able to tell stories in print is that I'm elected to write most of our affidavits and reports.

My Captain wants me to write a grant proposal for money to purchase assault rifles... Problem is we're the DoD and can technically just have them allocated to use through the 1033 program... dumbass


So here's a random question, do any of you keep newspaper articles from your arrests/cases? Or like articles that mention you specifically? My buddy is a deputy and has started collecting articles from our local paper that involve him, I just want to know if he's the only one.

I know guys that do that but I don't.  I'm just not narcissistic enough.
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#27
Have you arrested anyone that changed for the better after their arrest/probation/conviction?

How well did the bigger fish launder their money if at all?

How did they do it?

How big are your surveillance teams?
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#28
Yes. Despite the fact that most of who we deal with are career criminals, there are some who just need a little guidance and who the syatem works for. I've had people come up to me years after I arrested them and thank me for being a part of getting their lives straightened out.

Depends on the fish. Mostly throught shell businesses/storefronts. Not really my area of expertise though, I've got a smoking hot IRS chick I can call for that.

Depends on what we are watching. Anywhere from two to fifteen or so guys, depending on the level of involvement from other agencies, importance of the target, and all the little particular twists and turns of the case. Normally though my team handles our usual type of cases with just the four of us.
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#29
Why do you hate freedom?

What are skills you acquired in the military that have carried over to LE, and/or vice versa (as in unique to either)?
The Kool-Aid is a lie.
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#30
Way more fun being the oppressor than being the oppressed  Wink

The things that have helped me most in LE that I first really perfected in the creamed corn are the intangible personality traits.  Honor, courage, commitment, all that jazz.  Knowing how to wear and maintain a uniform, hygiene, being punctual, the leadership traits and experience, the confidence, integrity, all of those things really go a long way to helping you land a career in LE, and to perform well within a para-military organization like a PD.  

Beyond that, the ability to deal with bullshit, to do things you don't necessarily want to do, to make the tough decisions that need to be made, under pressure, in the worst of conditions, surrounded by chaos, all of those intangible qualities are things that help to separate a good officer from a great one.  Not all military personnel possess these qualities, just like not all who possess them were prior service, but the experience gained in the miitary can go a long way toward developing attributes like these.

Familiarity with structure, with being organized, handling weapons, physical altercations, working long hours, dealing with extreme boredom...all these are important attributes to have a cop as well.  I sort of feel like I'm rambling at this point, but I think you get the just of what I'm trying to say.
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#31
Also I've found that the diversity of the corps on a cultural level helps you be much less shocked when you run across strange and different personalities or backgrounds.
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#32
Actually a really informative answer. Expected some of it, but yeah. Another question; were you a LEO before/after enlisting, and before/after deploying?

If you don't mind answering that is
The Kool-Aid is a lie.
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#33
I got into LE after my second deployment. I came home and was getting ready to get out because the wife didn't want me to extend for a third tour. In her words, she married a Marine who was getting out of the Corps, not one who had a death wish. I didn't really consider LE as a career and had no real direction to head in with my life, and she basically talked me in to going to the academy and giving it a shot. Lo and behold, it stuck.
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#34
I worked midnight shift security for years, A co worker had me apply for a School Police opening since I had kids in school. Watched the towers get hit while waiting my turn in front of the interview board. It's basic SRO work, still pumping along.
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#35
How old do you think is "too old" to become a cop? Ideally I'd want to get hired by 25, but it's just not looking like that's going to be the case. At age 23, my current plan is to do an enlistment, get my Masters, and hopefully get a job by the time I'm 30.
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#36
I've seen people come on as old as 35 to 40.
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#37
You'll be fine. It varies state by state and agency by agency what the age cutoof is, but usually it's well into the 30's or 40's. YOu shouldn't have any problems if your plan is to go into LE after your enlistment. TONS of guys do exactly that all the time.

What is your masters going to be in? I only ask because there is NO money in this and you will be the dumbest smart guy in the world if you waste all that time and effort getting a masters just to pursue a career in LE.
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#38
Where I live (well, just over the state line from where I live) cops make great money. Shooting for a MPA degree because I'm a statist pig.
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#39
Can I go with you guys on a ride along?

Can you help me work on my handcuffing and searching?

What kind of patrol vehicles do you have?

Do you have to play 'adult' a lot of the times for dumb calls, i.e. 'My neighbor's dog is barking and it's 4pm. Can you make it stop?'
You'll have to speak up, I'm not wearing any pants.

F18WrenchMonkey: NSF is grand master champion at being apathetic
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#40
(03-07-2015, 12:08 PM)soup Wrote: Where I live (well, just over the state line from where I live) cops make great money.  Shooting for a MPA degree because I'm a statist pig.

Great money in comparison to what?  

My point was really more that you don't need a master's to be a cop.  If policing is what you want to get into, then pursue that for the right reasons, if it's more of a side show kinda thing that you would like to try just so that you can say you did it...please don't.  

I'm not saying that your master's program isn't or shouldn't be important to you, just that it seems unnecessary if your goal is to end up as a police officer.

(03-07-2015, 01:12 PM)NSFgirl Wrote: Can I go with you guys on a ride along?

Can you help me work on my handcuffing and searching?

What kind of patrol vehicles do you have?

Do you have to play 'adult' a lot of the times for dumb calls, i.e. 'My neighbor's dog is barking and it's 4pm. Can you make it stop?'

We used to have a ride along program, then on of the ride alongs got punched in the face while they were sitting in the car on a call, and that ended that.

[creepyvoice]Yes, yes I can...step over this way young lady, I'd be happy to help you work on your techniques...first, we start with you down on your knees...[/creepyvoice]

We have three new Caprice PPV's, an Explorer PI, an Expedition, and three Crown Vics that are the K9 and Detective's cars. We also have my old, beat ass 2001 Impala UC car with a blown motor in it, a Lexus, and a Land Rover that I seized and am not allowed to drive, and an older unmarked Explorer that is the Asst Chief's take home car.
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#41
You get better pay in most Chicago suburban departments just by having the Masters. Welcome to the great bureaucratic mess that is IL.

And $80K+ a year is pretty great in comparison to just about any other job.
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#42
Fair enough, ride along programs aren't always the best idea, http://www.whidbeynewstimes.com/news/214982971.html#
You'll have to speak up, I'm not wearing any pants.

F18WrenchMonkey: NSF is grand master champion at being apathetic
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#43
(03-07-2015, 01:35 PM)soup Wrote: You get better pay in most Chicago suburban departments just by having the Masters. Welcome to the great bureaucratic mess that is IL.

And $80K+ a year is pretty great in comparison to just about any other job.

Really? I find that completely strange.   

Dude $80k a year is pretty good, and would be toward the higher end of what cop jobs pay around here.  I made $75k last year and that's with NO degree whatsoever.  See what I mean?
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#44
I get entirely what you mean, but if the degree's going to be free, than I want it anyways. I'm not under any retarded impressions that it'll make me a better civil servant or anything like that.
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#45
Gotcha. So why DO you want to be a cop then?

(03-07-2015, 01:39 PM)NSFgirl Wrote: Fair enough, ride along programs aren't always the best idea, http://www.whidbeynewstimes.com/news/214982971.html#

Yeah one fucknut screws it up for everyone. That's usually how it goes. Oh, as far as your last question went:

Yeah, oftentimes I feel like the only grownup on scene where there are a bunch of people older than me acting like 5 year olds. You hit one of my pet peeves actually. Loud music calls.

Caller: "My neighbors have been playing that music super loud all day long, I want them arrested!"

Officer Friendlypants: "Did you try maybe, going next door and asking them politely to turn the music down?"

Caller: "Gah, why are you cops so lazy, worthless and stupid? I want your badge number!"

Seriously, it's amazing that a large portion of the populace can breathe on their own without help.
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#46
That pretty much mirrors the loud noise complaints we get. We joke that our rate MA really stands for Military Adult because, most often that's all we are.

I think my second pet peeve after those calls are being on scene with a partner who can't remain courteous and professional, and needs more babysitting than they are helpful.

A few things I'm big on is; communication, professionalism, awareness of the situation at hand, and it doesn't matter if you are friends or not, always have your partner's back.

How much re-learning/learning of new or different techniques did you have to do in transition from .mil training to civ patrol?

Is there an age limit on patrol, or is it more how well you pass the various tests, and your physical fitness level?
You'll have to speak up, I'm not wearing any pants.

F18WrenchMonkey: NSF is grand master champion at being apathetic
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#47
(03-07-2015, 02:40 PM)NSFgirl Wrote: That pretty much mirrors the loud noise complaints we get.  We joke that our rate MA really stands for Military Adult because, most often that's all we are.

I think my second pet peeve after those calls are being on scene with a partner who can't remain courteous and professional, and needs more babysitting than they are helpful.

A few things I'm big on is; communication, professionalism, awareness of the situation at hand, and it doesn't matter if you are friends or not, always have your partner's back.

How much re-learning/learning of new or different techniques did you have to do in transition from .mil training to civ patrol?

Is there an age limit on patrol, or is it more how well you pass the various tests, and your physical fitness level?


All of my .mil MP experience was on the field side.  Aside from a security detail at the Marine Corps Marathon one year, I did exactly zero LE related stuff while I was in.  Never once set foot in PMO.  The training we received at MP school covered all that, but it wasn't ingrained enough in my mind that I had to re train anything away when I became a civvie cop.   

Departments set their own hiring standards, to include age limits if they have them.  I know the state police here cut off at 40.  I think the City does as well.  It's more about your fitness level and your ability to pass the academy.
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#48
Not sure if this applies to you guys, but as I understand it, there are situations where a person can choose not to press charges on someone but a police department can choose to, even after the fact. It makes total sense if say, a lady was being beat by her guy and chances are he will do it again or worse after they leave, but it works with things like petty theft as well. How does that work? Are people just fucked if it was a legitimate misunderstanding? Even if not, are both parties dragged into the legal process and court even if they tried to avoid it by not pressing charges?
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#49
That depends on the situation. Shoplifting for instance the merchant can have the final say on prosecution especially when if the property is recovered. Violent crimes such as domestic violence and rape not so much as they are mandated reporting also, The DA office has people that will work with the victims on that.
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#50
What are some guns you wish you could have kept from guys you've arrested?

How many of your co-workers actually have degrees? Are the degrees in useful majors?

Do things like Crisis Intervention training/FTO and things like that pay more per month than a degree for your specific department?

Have any of your co-workers in the past or present taken steroids?

How hard is it to be the guy who gets to work with the K-9 unit?
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